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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
article, "new york times," egypt tumult, a rift emerges in morsi's team. morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, they say hey, you know what? we're not going to be involved in the process. we're just going to sit back here. we're going to read our koran. and we're just going to sit back. suddenly they decide we're going to be involved in the process, which is all right. and then we see this weekend, morsi is seizing power that he doesn't have. egypt's about to get really ugly again. >> you know, i think that you see the pushback in the streets. morsi's not going to be able to get away with everything that he wants to get away with. they've turned a corner. >> what's his justification for seizing all of this power illegally? >> hubris. the guy -- he had just helped broker a deal in gaza, and he felt that he had some running room with the americans because he, you know, had essentially done our bidding. >> he's got the president of the united states calling him, the american secretary of state. >> that kind of goes to your head. >> yeah. i'm a big guy. >> you know, you live half your
are gathering in tahrir square after egypt approved a controversial new draft constitution. it's a move that's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that
for themselves. when you look at nations in transition like afghanistan and egypt, people there say they're concerned more about continuity and aid. they have worries about what getting to know a new administration would mean for them. in europe, it's about economic growth. in fact, a poll was done across europe showed 75% of europeans would choose obama, in places like germany, 92%. if you look at israel, say, the landslide there if the election happened there would be romney's. there's been a lot of support for him after he visited and he's expressed vocal support for any potential israeli action against iran's nuclear facilities. veroni veronica? >> interesting. michelle kosinski, we appreciate it. >>> msnbc will have special edesk day coverage throughout the day tomorrow. we'll bring you the best primetime coverage at 6:00 eastern with rachel maddow and chris matthews. >>> and now for a look at the weather and that nor'easter that's headed our way. nbc meteorologist bill karins is down in democracy plaza for us. he got the good assignment this morning. >> good monday morning. a beaut
thing. >> jonathan capehart. >> i learned president morsi of egypt is fanatical about "planet of the apes." >> that is really all you need to know. jonathan, thank you so much. rana, steve, michael and everybody, thank you for watching today. if it's "way too early," it's "morning joe." chuck todd is next with "the daily rundown." >>> together again. mitt romney makes his way to the white house. it's not exactly the way he wanted to get there. but can something constructive come out of a private lunch between president obama and the man he defeated just three weeks ago? that's right. that was just three weeks ago. >>> also this morning, a deep dive into america's longest war. look into lessons learned and the sacrifices made by troops at one combat outpost. tell us about what's been accomplished and what's not in more than a decade of fighting. as the country wakes up obsessed with numbers and winners, for the lottery, that, we've got a very important update on the election night numbers that gave us a winner. they've been changing steadily as the states keep on counting. and
their laptops, and they simply type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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